Pruning shrub tree

Bare Root Planting


There are many advantages of choosing bare root roses, they tend to be good quality, with a wide root expanse for quick and healthy formation.  The root system establishes quickly if they are planted correctly, and will not require the same watering demands as container grown roses.

Bare Root Planting

There are many advantages of choosing bare root roses, they tend to be good quality, with a wide root expanse for quick and healthy formation.  The root system establishes quickly if they are planted correctly, and will not require the same watering demands as container grown roses.

Roses last for many years and establish quickly and easily if you follow some simple planting and aftercare tips:

When to plant:

Bare root rose planting is best carried out in late winter as long as the ground is not frozen.

How to plant bare root roses:

  1. Mix in at least one bucket of rotted organic matter (such as manure) per square meter.
  2. For a single rose plant, dig a hole around twice the width of the plant's roots and deep enough to not restrict the roots, and ensure the graft point (where the main rose joins the rootstock and the branches originate) is at soil level, and not proud of this.
  3. Apply a general fertiliser over the surface and fork it in.
  4. Place the rose in the center of the hole and back-fill gently with the excavated soil.
  5. Spacing depends on type and habit. Check catalogue or label details for more information.

Aftercare:

  • Water well in dry spells for at least two summers after planting
  • Feed and mulch annually. Apply the fertiliser over the existing mulch, from where it will quickly find its way down to the roots, and then top up the mulch to maintain it at the original level.

Replacing roses:

When replacing roses there is a high risk of replant disease ( soil sickness) occurring.  To prevent this ensure that you dig out the soil to a depth and width of 45cm (18in) and exchange it with new soil or soil from a different part of your garden.