Rosebush - Rose care - Ornamental Flower Care - Plant Care - Garden Care - Bayer Garden

A guide to selecting roses


Choosing the right types of roses for your garden or home requires some thought and planning because of the extensive variety of shapes, sizes, colours and blooms.

Choosing the right types of roses for your garden or home requires some thought and planning because of the extensive variety of shapes, sizes, colours and blooms.

With a little careful consideration, roses can create dramatic, simple or stunning effects in your garden and home.
There are a number of factors to consider:

  • Roses thrive in the sun, so choose an area with good exposure.
  • Consider the space available - if you are limited, consider dwarf or miniature rose varieties.
  • Larger spaces can afford to have a more sizeable rose bush which can be used to add large swathes of colour when in bloom.
  • Some rose bush varieties are suitable for creating a colourful hedge, while other climbing varieties are ideal to creep up pergolas.
  • Consider what the best size is for your garden and also the colours that you would like to introduce into your outdoor living space.
  • Think about the colours that will work in your garden and look at neighbouring gardens to identify what types of roses work well in your locality.
  • Work with what is available in your local garden centres and nurseries; these will be cultivated with your location and conditions in mind.
Buy roses from certified growers and check that they have been registered as a guarantee of the plant’s varietal origin to achieve consistent size, colour and quality.

 

There are two key types available in local nurseries and garden centres either bareroot or container grown roses.

Bareroot roses

They are only viable when the plant is still in its dormant phase. If a bareroot becomes heated in-store or during transport, it may take it from its dormant state and produce weak growth. Therefore, they need to be planted as quickly as possible, keeping them moist at all times before planting. When purchasing, select a vigorous rose specimen that has a well-developed, fibrous root systems with smooth green stems that have a diameter of 7-8mm.

Container-grown or potted roses

These are available all year round and can be transplanted with ease. Select carefully, look for more extensive root systems which will help when transplanting the rose plant, as the soil ball will remain intact.

Container grown roses can be transplanted with success throughout the year; extra protection may be needed over winter to protect autumn planted flowers. In most climates, when growing roses, the earlier they are planted, the greater the chance of success.

For growing in patio pots or containers, choose a rose plant that has been propagated by cutting. They will have strong and stable root systems. Eliminating the rootstock also means that basal suckers will not grow or monopolise the nutrients from the new shoots.

 

Tip: to keep your roses healthy, try using Toprose.